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Grammar notes

 

For those of you who have exams and need help with some areas of grammar, I've included here a few of the more important topics at roughly upper intermediate level:

ability
conditionals
futures
habits
passives
past tenses
phrasal verbs
present tenses
present perfect
relative clauses
reported speech
reporting verbs
wish

They're all followed by a practice exercise. The explanations are in English because by this stage you should know enough to be able to understand. And anyway, there are a lot of non-Spanish people who visit this site.

On each page there's a link to a printer-friendly version of the explanation. A new window opens, which you should close when you've finished. The original window remains open.

Clearly you'll need a lot more than this to prepare for exams, but the basic aim of this site is not English grammar. There are other sites specialising in grammar and nothing else. That's why I've included a number of links to sites with more content and more practice activities.

Where do I go?

There's a list of grammar topics at the top of this page. Once you're on a grammar topic, the links are in the menu on the left.

Outside this website there are loads of other websites where you can find grammar explanations and practice exercises.

Examples of grammar on the internet

When you want to see how a particular form of English grammar is used, you can do this easily by using the internet. I've done it with Explorer, but I imagine it can be done with other browsers.

Enter the website of a newspaper, for instance, and then choose something you're interested in. Try it with The Guardian or the BBC, two excellent sites that are still free.

Then click on 'Edition', and then on 'Look for'. This option will look for a word or some letters within a word.

For example, if you want to see how we use relative pronouns, you can look for that or which, etc, using the 'whole word' option.

If you want gerunds or participles, you can do the same thing, but with ing and without choosing the 'whole word' option.

Printable exercises and notes

Most of the exercises and grammar explanations now have a pdf version. This means you don't have to be tied to the computer in order to practise your English. If you click on the link, a pdf file will open in another window and you can print it out and do it when and where you want.

You can also download and store the file on your own computer. Right click on the link to the pdf file, then click on 'Save target as...'. A dialogue box will appear and you can choose exactly where you want to download it to on your computer.

The exercises are basically the same, but it's impossible to reproduce them exactly on paper. Therefore they're the traditional type of exercise - gapfill and multiple choice - and you'll have to come back to the online versions of the exercises to check your answers.

Nevertheless it's useful for people who don't have their computer online all day. It's also useful for teachers who are desperate for an exercise to practise something they've already presented in class.

But be careful. The phrasal verb exercises for example haven't got a list of verbs to choose from - they're on the grammar notes page - so you'll have to think of the correct verbs with the only clue being the letter they begin with (or thereabouts). The verbs will need to be presented in class first if the aim is to practise something you've already taught.

Now what are you looking for?

I need someone to translate a Spanish text into English.

I've got a question.

I want to know who you are, what you do and how much you charge.

   

 
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